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Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things

  • Kind of Object:
    Booklet
  • Name:
    Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things

    Word Count: 5

  • Creator (Person):
    Nikolaus Pevsner
  • Creator (Organisation):
    Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.)
  • Year Start:
    1946
  • Year End:
    1946
  • Known addresses in Metromod cities:

    Council for Visual Education, 13 Suffolk Street, West End, London SW1.

  • Language:
    English
  • Size:

    18 x 12,2 cm

  • City:
    London (GB)
  • Introduction:

    Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things is a booklet written in 1946 by the emigrated architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner with the aim of aesthetic education and teacher training.

    Word Count: 26

  • Content:

    Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged is a booklet (20 pages, 18 x 12.2 cm) written in 1946 by the emigrated architectural historian Nikolaus Pevsner (1902–1983), published with the aim of aesthetic education and teacher training: “No Education is complete which does not include the appreciation of design in all its aspects – architecture, town, country planning and the fine and industrial arts”. This motto introduces the booklet, which was published in the Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.) series.
    Nikolaus Pevsner, who was actually a specialist in painting and architecture of the 17th century, qualified himself as an expert in design and taste with his books Pioneers of the Modern Movement from William Morris to Walter Gropius (1936) and An Enquiry into Industrial Art in England (1937).

    In his foreword, the art historian Herbert Read, who was vice-chairman of the C.V.E., supports the publication of the booklet by referring to the increasing importance of and sensitivity for design in British society: “To arouse that sense of beauty, to instill it into our educational system and our planning authorities, is the purpose of the Council for Visual Education. It is part of the policy of this Council to issue from time to time pamphlets which will be of some guidance to teachers, lecturers, and all who are concerned in laying the aesthetic foundation of our future society.” (Read 1946, 2)

    Pevsner asks how well-designed everyday things could be used by teachers for visual education and by what criteria they could be recognised as well-designed (Pevsner 1946, 4). Pevsner refers to the Circulation Department of the Victoria & Albert Museum, where art schools, local museums and secondary schools could borrow objects, photographs and slides for demonstration purposes. Images of pots, dishes and pottery, as well as curtains and a radiogram, are used to show that “decorative qualities exist independently of functional qualities” (15). Pevsner placed “qualities of proportion, composition and the more complicated emotional qualities” (19) at the centre of a distinction between good and bad everyday design. The drawing of a Jaguar car on the cover of the booklet sets the aesthetic tone and exemplifies the aesthetic design praised by the author.

    In the same year that Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things was published, Nikolaus Pevsner, together with the textile designers Margaret Leischner and Enid Marx among others, was part of a team of specialists sent to post-war Germany by the British military intelligence service’s British Intelligence Objectives Sub-Committee (BIOS) with the aim of investigating German product design in industrial enterprises in the American and British occupation zones. It is worth noting that both Pevsner and Leischner obtained British citizenship in the course of these BIOS trips, enabling them to travel abroad as members of military intelligence (Sudrow 2012, 111). For Pevsner, this mission, and his own personal mission to guide British taste, go hand in hand with the development of his interest in conducting research in his country of exile.

    The habilitated art historian Nikolaus Pevsner was a private lecturer at Göttingen University when he was dismissed because of his Jewish origins in 1933 on the basis of the Law for the Restoration of the Professional Civil Service. After emigrating to England – he had already been there for a short research stay in 1930 – Pevsner was commissioned by the Department of Trade Economics at Birmingham University to conduct an industrial sociological study of companies in the Midlands. Anne Sudrow writes: “Employing the recently developed methods of empirical social research, with which he familiarised himself in Birmingham, he explored the standards and practices of industrial design in British consumer goods firms. He conducted approximately two hundred interviews with entrepreneurs and managers, wholesalers and retailers as well as artists and artistic consultants working as product designers.” (Sudrow 2012, 108) His findings, published as An Enquiry into Industrial Art (1937) by Cambridge University Press, formulated a critique of the aesthetics and form of contemporary British design. Parallel to this was his book Pioneers of the Modern Movement. From William Morris to Walter Gropius, published by Faber & Faber in 1936, in which Pevsner drew a line between the sophisticated design principles of the Arts and Crafts movement in 19th-century Britain and continental modernism, especially the Bauhaus art school.

    Pevsner’s empirical design research laid the foundations for both his later work for the Council for Visual Education and his involvement with the BIOS mission in Germany. Although Pevsner’s critical approach did generate dissenting voices, he received a great deal of encouragement, for example from Herbert Read, but also from the furniture entrepreneur Gordon Russel, who hired Pevsner as a consultant on design issues in 1935 (Muthesius 1990, 190). Gordon Russel later became the second head of the Council of Industrial Design. As deputy director of the Architectural Review from 1941 to 1945, Pevsner was able to have a direct impact on the public perception of architecture and design. At the same time, he taught at Birkbeck College. From the late 1940s, Pevsner was Slade Professor, first at Cambridge, then later at Oxford.

    Pevsner was not only an émigré who was able to secure his professional reputation institutionally, he also remained closely networked with the émigré community. He was one of the guests present at the Farewell Dinner for Walter Gropius, the send-off to the USA of the architect who had emigrated to London in 1937. After the outbreak of the war, Pevsner spent some time as an enemy alien in Huyton Camp, Liverpool, where the architect Harry Seidler, the artists Hugo Dachinger and Walter Nessler and the choreographer Kurt Joos were also interned (Feather 2004). It was at Huyton Camp that the idea for Pevsner's successful book An Outline of European Architecture was born, published by Penguin in 1943 and translated into numerous languages. Pevsner wrote art criticism for the émigré newspaper Die Zeitung, to which Walter Trier and Richard Ziegler contributed cartoons. The exiled art historian Rosa Schapire worked for Pevsner’s The Buildings of England series (Pevsner 1954), which he had been developing since 1945 and which looked at the building tradition of his new homeland across English counties and villages. Volume 1 of the series was published in 1951 and almost 50 volumes were produced during his lifetime, of which he was the sole author of 38.

    Like other intellectuals and scientists – such as the zoologist Julian Huxley – Pevsner used the new information media to popularise his approaches. Pevsner had been on the air at the BBC since 1946, and his 1955 series of lectures on “Englishness of English Art” appeared in print a year later and was evidence of his continuing preoccupation with the history of architecture and design in his country of exile. In the preface Pevsner writes: “Here it is my sole intention to answer the question which might well be asked, why I should have set myself up as judge of English qualities in English art, being neither English-born nor English-bred, having entered England only at the age of twenty-eight and lived in the country not much longer than twenty years. Twenty years is admittedly not a long time to learn to understand a country. On the other hand my antecedents might be accepted as specially useful for the task. For one thing the very fact of having come into a country with fresh eyes at some stage, and then of having settled down gradually to become part of it, may constitute a great advantage. As for my own professional career I had worked on Saxon Baroque architecture at Leipzig and Dresden, and then on Italian Baroque painting, before I first reached England in 1930. The contrast was complete, and it was, against all expectations, agreeable too. Stimulated by this accidental demonstration of opposite national qualities in art, I began to collect material on the subject of this book.” (Pevser 1956, 9) His foreword expresses the view of the emigrant who notices aspects that others may not notice.
    In 1969, Nikolaus Pevsner was knighted, an honour also bestowed on the exiled art historian Ernst H. Gombrich. In 2007, an English Heritage blue plaque was mounted on Pevsner’s home at 2 Wildwood Terrace in Hampstead, where he lived from 1936 until his death in 1983 (Waite 2007).

    Word Count: 1345

  • Signature Image:
    Nikolaus Pevsner. Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged. Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.), 1946, cover (METROMOD Archive).
  • Media:
    Nikolaus Pevsner. Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged. Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.), 1946, title page (METROMOD Archive).
    Nikolaus Pevsner. Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged. Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.), 1946, pp. 2–3: Foreword by Herbert Read. (METROMOD Archive).
    Nikolaus Pevsner. Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged. Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.), 1946, pp. 8–9 (METROMOD Archive).
    Nikolaus Pevsner. Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged. Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.), 1946, pp. 14–15 (METROMOD Archive).
  • Bibliography (selected):

    Amery, Colin. “Nikolaus Pevsner. Pioneers of the Modern Movement from William Morris to Walter Gropius, 1936.” The Books that shaped Art History from Gombrich and Greenberg to Alpers and Krauss, edited by Richard Shone and John-Paul Stonard, Thames & Hudson, 2013, pp. 66–75.

    Draper, Peter, editor. Reassessing Nikolaus Pevsner. Ashgate, 2004.

    Feather, Jessica. Art behind barbed wire, exh. cat. Walker Art Gallery, National Museums Liverpool, Liverpool, 2004.

    Muthesius, Stefan. “Nikolaus Pevsner (1902–1985). ” Altmeister moderner Kunstgeschichte, edited by Heinrich Dilly, Dietrich Reimer Verlag, 1990, pp. 189–204.

    Pevsner, Nikolaus. Pioneers of the Modern Movement from William Morris to Walter Gropius. Faber & Faber, 1936.

    Pevsner, Nikolaus. An Enquiry into Industrial Art in England. Cambridge University Press, 1937.

    Pevsner, Nikolaus. An Outline of European Architecture. Penguin, 1943.

    Pevsner, Nikolaus. Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged. Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.), 1946.

    Pevsner, Nikolaus. “Rosa Schapire (gest.).” Kunstchronik, vol. 7, no. 4, 1954, pp. 111–112.

    Pevsner, Nikolaus. The Englishness of English Art. An expanded and annotated version of the REITH LECUTURES broadcast in October and November 1955. Architectural Press, 1956.

    Pevsner, Nikolaus, et al. Geheimreport Deutsches Design. Deutsche Konsumgüter im Visier des britischen Council of Industrial Design (1946) (Deutsches Museum, Abhandlungen und Berichte, Neue Folge, 28), edited by Anne Sudrow, Wallstein, 2012.

    Read, Herbert. “Foreword.” Nikolaus Pevsner. Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things. An attempt to establish criteria by which the aesthetic qualities of design can be judged. Council for Visual Education (C.V.E.), 1946, pp. 2–3.

    Sudrow, Anne. “Competing for a Modern Consumer Culture: German Industrial Design under Investigation by the British Military Intelligence Service BIOS.” Nikolaus Pevsner et al. Geheimreport Deutsches Design. Deutsche Konsumgüter im Visier des britischen Council of Industrial Design (1946) (Deutsches Museum, Abhandlungen und Berichte, Neue Folge, 28), edited by Anne Sudrow, Wallstein, 2012, pp. 106–118.

    Waite, Richard. “Pevsner honoured with blue plaque.” Architect’s Journal, 6 November 2007, www.architectsjournal.co.uk/news/pevsner-honoured-with-blue-plaque. Accessed 25 March 2021.

    Word Count: 307

  • Archives and Sources:

    The Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles, Nikolaus Pevsner papers, 1903–1982.

    Word Count: 9

  • Author:
    Burcu Dogramaci
  • Metropolis:
    London
  • Entry in process:
    no
  • Burcu Dogramaci. "Visual Pleasures from Everyday Things." METROMOD Archive, 2021, https://archive.metromod.net/viewer.p/69/1470/object/5140-11267229, last modified: 01-05-2021.
  • Rosa Schapire
    Art Historian

    The art historian Rosa Schapire, a supporter of Expressionist art, contributed to the presence of Expressionist art in England with loans and donations from her art collections rescued to London.

    Word Count: 30

    Ludwig Meidner, Portrait of Rosa Schapire, London, 1946, sketchbook 8 July 1945–13 September 1946, pencil on paper, 28 x 21 cm (© Ludwig Meidner-Archiv, Jüdisches Museum der Stadt Frankfurt am Main).
    First number of Eidos art magazine with two reviews by Rosa Schapire, no. 1, May–June 1950, cover (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).First number of Eidos art magazine with Schapire’s book reviews “Otto Mueller, Freiburg” and “Paul Klee. Handzeichnungen II. 1921–1930, Bergen”, vol. 1, no. 1, May-June 1950, p. 48 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire. “Matisse in der Tate Gallery.” Die Weltkunst, vol. 23, no. 4, 1953, p. 11 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire. “Mexikanische Kunst in der Tate Gallery.” Die Weltkunst, vol. 23, no. 9, 1953, H. 9, p. 3 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire’s reviews “Deutsche Expressionisten in Leicester” and “Josef Herman bei Roland Browse and Delbanco” in art magazine Die Weltkunst, vol. 23, no. 21, 1953, p. 3 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire. “Russische Emigrantenkünstler aus Paris in London.” Die Weltkunst, vol. 24, no. 2, 1954, p. 4 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire’s last published essay “Wall-Paintings in the Alexanderkirche at Wildeshausen” in The Connoisseur, vol. 133, no. 535, 1954, p. 9 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).
    London
    Julian Huxley
    ZoologistPhilosopherWriter

    Julian Huxley was the director of London Zoo from 1935 to 1942 and worked closely with emigrant photographers, artists and architects, including Berthold Lubetkin, Erna Pinner and Wolf Suschitzky.

    Word Count: 27

    Editorial by Julian Huxley in the first issue of Animal and Zoo Magazine, no. 1, 1936, p. 6 (METROMOD Archive).
    Charlotte Wolff. Studies in Hand-Reading. Chatto & Windus, 1936, p. 77: Reading Julian and Aldous Huxley’s hands (Deutsche Nationalbibliothek, Deutsches Exilarchiv 1933–1945, Frankfurt am Main).Charlotte Wolff. “The Form and Dermatoglyphs of the Hands and Feet of certain Anthropoid Apes”. Proceedings of the Zoological Society of London, Series A, 1937, Part 3, 347 + Plate (Library of the Zoological Institute, University of Hamburg). At the zoo’s behest, Charlotte Wolff applied chirology to the primates at London Zoo.“Young Artists in the Zoo” reads the headline to this photo essay on the Animal Art Studio at London Zoo, published in the Animal and Zoo Magazine, vol. 2, no. 11, 1938, p. 18–19 (METROMOD Archive).Julian Huxley and Ludwig Koch. Animal Language. Photographs by Ylla. Country Life, 1938, cover (METROMOD Archive). Two records of animal voices were included with this sound book.Erna Pinner. “Map of geographical distribution.” Julian S. Huxley. Zoo. Official Guide to the Gardens and Aquarium of the Zoological Society of London, 1937, pp. 102–103 (ZSL Library, London, Original © Erna Pinner).Julian Huxley and Wolf Suschitzky. Kingdom of the Beasts. Thames & Hudson, 1956, pp. 157–158 (© The Estate of Wolfgang Suschitzky)László Moholy-Nagy, Bill of Fare, farewell dinner menu for Walter Gropius, London, March 1937: List of Toasts naming Julian Huxley as chairman of the event (Pritchard Papers, University of East Anglia, @ László Moholy-Nagy).
    London
    Margaret Leischner
    Textile Designer

    The designer Margaret Leischner lived in England from 1938, worked for textile and furniture companies, taught at the Royal College of Art and was honoured as Royal Designer for Industry.

    Word Count: 29

    Tintawn Carpets brochure featuring designs by Margaret Leischner (Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, Margaret Leischner Papers, Folder 6, Inv. No. 7568).
    Margaret Leischner, Advertisement for BOAC (British Overseas Airways Corporation), seat fabrics, 1955 (Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, Margaret Leischner Papers, Folder 12, Inv. No. 75693).Brochure: “Choose comfort with Guy Rogers for 1963” featuring Leischner’s fabric for the ‘New Yorker’ upholstered furniture series (Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, Margaret Leischner Papers, Folder 6, Inv. No. 10523).Company brochure: “Design in Yarn”, R. Greg & Co. Ltd. South Reddish, Stockport (Bauhaus-Archiv Berlin, Margaret Leischner Papers, Folder 6, Inv. No. 10522).Tintawn Carpets brochure (Eileen Ellis, Photo: Burcu Dogramaci, 2011).Margaret Leischner, Sisal sample Tintawn Carpets, 1960s (Eileen Ellis, Photo: Burcu Dogramaci, 2011).Margaret Leischner obituary, by Donald Tomlinson, Design Journal, vol. 5, no. 259, 1970, p. 83 (Photo: Private Archive).
    London
    Herbert Read
    Art HistorianArt CriticPoet

    The British art historian Herbert Read established himself as a central figure in the London artistic scene in the 1930s and was one of the outstanding supporters of exiled artists.

    Word Count: 30

    Howard Coster, Herbert Read, 1934 (Art in Britain 1930–40 1965, 5).
    Howard Coster, Herbert Read, 1934 (© National Portrait Gallery, London, NPG x19537).“Map showing where some of the people connected with the modern movement in art lived in Hampstead during the 1930s.” (Art in Britain 1930–40 1965, 9).Mall Studios behind Parkhill Road in Hampstead, occupied during the 1930s by Barbara Hepworth, Ben Nicholson, Cecil Stephenson and Herbert Read (Art in Britain 1930–40 1965, 8).Herbert Read. Art Now. An Introduction to the Theory of Modern Painting and Sculpture. Harcourt, Brace & Company, 1933, cover (METROMOD Archive).
    London
    Focus on Architecture and Sculpture
    Book

    Focus on Architecture and Sculpture by émigré photographer Helmut Gernsheim brought together his work and experience as a photographer for the National Buildings Record (NBR).

    Word Count: 25

    Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, cover (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).
    Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 1 (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 2 and 3 (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 4 and 5 (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 6 and 7 (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 14 and 15 (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 52 and 53 (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 54a, 54b and 55 (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).Helmut Gernsheim. Focus on Architecture and Sculpture. An Original Approach to the Photography of Architecture and Sculpture. The Fountain Press, 1949, pl. 60a and 60b (Archive Burcu Dogramaci).
    London
    Farewell Dinner for Walter Gropius
    Dinner

    Friends and colleagues came together on 9 March 1937 to send off the architect Walter Gropius and his wife Ise Gropius, who had decided to leave for the United States.

    Word Count: 28

    László Moholy-Nagy, Bill of Fare, farewell dinner menu for Walter Gropius, London, March 1937, front page (Pritchard Papers, University of East Anglia, © László Moholy-Nagy).
    László Moholy-Nagy, Bill of Fare, farewell dinner menu for Walter Gropius, London, March 1937 (Pritchard Papers, University of East Anglia, © László Moholy-Nagy).László Moholy-Nagy, Bill of Fare, farewell dinner menu for Walter Gropius, London, March 1937, Alphabetical List of Guests (Pritchard Papers, University of East Anglia, © László Moholy-Nagy).Portrait of Walter Gropius, London, c. 1937 (Pritchard Papers, University of East Anglia). This photo was included in the Bill of Fare farewell dinner menu for Walter Gropius designed by László Moholy-Nagy.
    London
    The Warburg Institute
    Research Institute

    The Kulturwissenschaftliche Bibliothek Warburg in Hamburg achieved a new presence in London after 1933 under the name The Warburg Institute as a research institution with a library and photo archive.

    Word Count: 29

    The Warburg Institute, Reading Room, Imperial Institute Building, London, c. 1952 (© The Warburg Institute).
    The Warburg Institute, Reading Room, Thames House, London, c. 1934/36 (© The Warburg Institute).The Warburg Institute, Reading Room, Woburn Square, London, c. 1958 (© The Warburg Institute).
    London
    Faber & Faber
    Publishing House

    Faber & Faber shows the importance of publishing houses as supporters of contemporary art movements and of the contribution of emigrants, helping to popularise their art and artistic theories.

    Word Count: 29

    Klee. With an Introduction and Notes by Herbert Read. The Faber Gallery. Faber & Faber, 1948, cover (METROMOD Archive).
    Klee. With an Introduction and Notes by Herbert Read. The Faber Gallery. Faber & Faber, 1948, pp. 2–3 (METROMOD Archive).
    London
    Die Zeitung
    Newspaper

    From 1941 to 1945, the émigré German-language newspaper Die Zeitung was published in London, reporting on the war on the continent and on the situation in Germany.

    Word Count: 25

    Front page of Die Zeitung, 7 April 1941 (Photo: Private Archive).
    Robert Ziller [Richard Ziegler], Quislings (I.): “Qui mange du Papen, en meurt", in Die Zeitung, 29 March 1941, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Robert Ziller [Richard Ziegler], Quislings (IV.) Tiso: Das Vorbild des Balkan-Quislings [Model of the Balkan Quisling], in Die Zeitung, 17 April 1941, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Robert Ziller [Richard Ziegler], “Seit vielen Monaten war ich zum Schweigen verurteilt” [For many months I had been condemned to silence], in Die Zeitung, 2 July 1941, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Robert Ziller [Richard Ziegler], B.D.M., in Die Zeitung, 8 July 1941, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Robert Ziller [Richard Ziegler], Mussolini, in Die Zeitung, 6 August 1941, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Robert Ziller [Richard Ziegler], Heinrich Himmler, in Die Zeitung, 27 October 1944, p. 4 (Photo: Private Archive).Walter Trier, Des Führers Ahnengalerie [The Führer’s Ancestral Gallery] in Die Zeitung, 3 September 1941, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Walter Trier, Der Führer: “Komm nur weiter, wir sind sicher bald oben!” [Keep coming, I’m sure we’ll be up there soon!] in Die Zeitung, 22 September 1941, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Walter Trier, Die Ingredientien einer Hitlerrede [The Ingredients of a Hitler Speech], in Die Zeitung, 3 January 1942, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive).Walter Trier, Himmler, Dr. Petiot: “Was? Lumpige 54 Morde? Anfänger!” [What? A measly 54 murders? Rookie!] in Die Zeitung, 3 January 1942, p. 3 (Photo: Private Archive). Walter Trier’s final illustration for Die Zeitung, dedicated to a fictional conversation between a serial killer (Petiot) and a mass murderer (Himmler).
    London
    The Story of Art
    Book

    The Story of Art by the émigré art historian Ernst H. Gombrich was published in 1950 with Phaidon Press. The book is a comprehensive and accessible introduction to visual culture.

    Word Count: 29

    Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, cover (Photo: Private Archive).
    Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, cover without dust jacket (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive).Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, first page with dedication by G.B., probably Gertrud Bing from the Warburg Institute in London and a colleague of Gombrich (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive). It reads “On 29 June 1950 from your friends from the Warburg Institute G.B.”.Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, title page with Velazquez’s Las Meninas (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive).Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950: Introduction by the author (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive).Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, p. 10–11: comparing Géricault’s Horce-racing at Epsom with a photo from 1948 (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive).Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, p. 20–21: reproductions of cave paintings in Altamira and Font de Gaume (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive).Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, p. 102–103: looking eastwards (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive).Ernst Gombrich’s The Story of Art, published with Phaidon Press in 1950, p. 440: reproduction of Henri Rousseau’s Portrait of Joseph Brunner, 1909, and Marc Chagall’s The Musician, 1912–13 (Staats- und Universitätsbibliothek Bremen, photo: Private Archive).
    London