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Golders Green Crematorium

  • Name:
    Golders Green Crematorium
  • Kind of Organisation:
    Crematorium
  • Introduction:

    Numerous emigrants were cremated in Golders Green Crematorium after their death, including the gallerist Alfred Flechtheim, the psychoanalyst Anna Freud, the architect Ernö Goldfinger and the art historian Rosa Schapire.

    Word Count: 30

  • Content:

    Designed by Ernest George and Alfred B. Yeates, Golders Green Crematorium is located in the London borough of Barnet in the neighbourhood Golders Green and was opened in 1902. Numerous emigrants were cremated in Golders Green Crematorium after their death, including the actors Elisabeth Bergner and Conrad Veidt, the gallerist Alfred Flechtheim, the psychoanalysts Sigmund Freud and Anna Freud, the architect Ernö Goldfinger and the art historian Rosa Schapire. The emigrants’ ashes were scattered in the Garden of Rest/Memorial Garden with a corresponding memorial plaque (e.g. Elisabeth Bergner, see Steinthaler 2008, 62), buried under a rose bush or kept in an urn. Sigmund Freud and his wife’s Martha Freud’s ashes rest in a Greek vase from the collection of antiquities Freud brought with him to London from Vienna. It stands on a marble column designed by Ernst Freud, surrounded by urns of other family members in the so-called Freud Corner in the Ernest George Columbarium. Alfred Flechtheim’s ashes were interred in a niche in the Jewish Cemetery (4062A) opposite the crematorium. Rosa Schapire’s burial was described by Marie Neurath in a letter dated 9 February 1954. She writes:
    “Yesterday, Monday, 8 February 10.45 in the morning a small group of friends – there were probably 30 people – gathered in a chapel of the crematorium in Golders Green to pay their last respects to Rosa. It was beautiful – the organ played the beautiful Bach melody for the G string and we were all quietly lost in thoughts of love and farewell, and then Professor Pevsner said a few words that expressed what all who were there had felt: Admiration for her courage, her youthfulness, her openness to everything new in which she participated until her last breath. He read passages from her last letter [...]. Finally, a Bach melody was played (Komm süßer Tod) and the flower-decorated coffin moved slowly to the back.” (Neurath 1954, Translation from German)
    The description of the ceremony shows that Golders Green was an important place for the London emigrant community, where they and local actors met to say goodbye.

    Word Count: 340

  • Known addresses in Metromod cities:

    62 Hoop Lane, Golders Green, London NW11.

  • Signature Image:
    Golders Green Crematorium, Hoop Lane, London, 2011 (Mark Ahsmann, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons).
  • Media:
    Urns with the ashes of Sigmund and Martha Freud and other family members, Ernest George Columbarium, part of Golders Green Crematorium (JHvW, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons).
  • Bibliography (selected):

    Freud, Ernst, et al., editors. Sigmund Freud. Sein Leben in Bildern und Texten. Insel, 1989.

    Grainger, Hilary J. “Golders Green Crematorium and the Architectural Expression of Cremation.” Mortality, vol. 5, no. 1, 2000, pp. 53–73. Taylor & Francis Online, doi: https://doi.org/10.1080/713685990. Accessed 25 February 2021.

    Jupp, Peter C., and Hilary J. Grainger, editors. Golders Green Crematorium, 1902–2002: A London Centenary in Context. London Cremation Company, 2002.

    Neurath, Marie. Letter to Agnes Holthusen. Agnes Holthusen Papers (Germanisches Nationalmuseum, Deutsches Kunstarchiv, Nuremberg, 9 February 1954), ZR ABK 421.

    Steinthaler, Evelyn. Jüdisches London (Mandelbaum City Guide). Mandelbaum, 2008.

    Word Count: 85

  • Author:
    Burcu Dogramaci
  • Date of Founding:
    1902
  • Metropolis:
    London
  • Entry in process:
    no
  • Burcu Dogramaci. "Golders Green Crematorium." METROMOD Archive, 2021, https://archive.metromod.net/viewer.p/69/1470/object/5145-11251943, last modified: 27-04-2021.
  • Rosa Schapire
    Art Historian

    The art historian Rosa Schapire, a supporter of Expressionist art, contributed to the presence of Expressionist art in England with loans and donations from her art collections rescued to London.

    Word Count: 30

    Ludwig Meidner, Portrait of Rosa Schapire, London, 1946, sketchbook 8 July 1945–13 September 1946, pencil on paper, 28 x 21 cm (© Ludwig Meidner-Archiv, Jüdisches Museum der Stadt Frankfurt am Main).
    First number of Eidos art magazine with two reviews by Rosa Schapire, no. 1, May–June 1950, cover (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).First number of Eidos art magazine with Schapire’s book reviews “Otto Mueller, Freiburg” and “Paul Klee. Handzeichnungen II. 1921–1930, Bergen”, vol. 1, no. 1, May-June 1950, p. 48 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire. “Matisse in der Tate Gallery.” Die Weltkunst, vol. 23, no. 4, 1953, p. 11 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire. “Mexikanische Kunst in der Tate Gallery.” Die Weltkunst, vol. 23, no. 9, 1953, H. 9, p. 3 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire’s reviews “Deutsche Expressionisten in Leicester” and “Josef Herman bei Roland Browse and Delbanco” in art magazine Die Weltkunst, vol. 23, no. 21, 1953, p. 3 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire. “Russische Emigrantenkünstler aus Paris in London.” Die Weltkunst, vol. 24, no. 2, 1954, p. 4 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).Rosa Schapire’s last published essay “Wall-Paintings in the Alexanderkirche at Wildeshausen” in The Connoisseur, vol. 133, no. 535, 1954, p. 9 (Zentralinstitut für Kunstgeschichte, Munich).
    London
    Anna Freud
    Psychoanalyst

    The psychoanalyst Anna Freud and her partner Dorothy Burlingham-Tiffany opened the War Nursery research and care facility in Hampstead in January 1941 under the impact of the bombing of London.

    Word Count: 29

    Anna Freud and Dorothy Burlingham, Jackson Nursery, Vienna, 1937 (© Freud Museum London).
    Dorothy Burlingham and Anna Freud. Annual Report of a Residential War Nursery. Hampstead Nursery, 1942, title page (Photo: Private Archive).Dorothy Burlingham and Anna Freud. Annual Report of a Residential War Nursery. Hampstead Nursery, 1942 (Photo: Private Archive). Page with addresses of Hampstead Nursery.Dorothy Burlingham and Anna Freud. Kriegskinder. Jahresbericht des Kriegskinderheims Hampstead Nurseries. Imago Publishing, 1949, cover (Photo: Private Archive). German version of Annual Report of a Residential War Nursery from 1942.Anna Freud and Dorothy Burlingham, Cork, 1949 (© Freud Museum London).Dorothy Burlingham and Anna Freud. Anstaltskinder. Imago Publishing, 1950, title page (Photo: Private Archive). German version of Infants without Families, 1943.Installation view from the Freud Museum London: Anna Freud at her loom, Walberswick, Suffolk, c. 1960s, Weaving Shuttles of Anna Freud, Crocheted scarf made by Anna Freud (Photo: Burcu Dogramaci, 2018. Courtesy of the Freud Museum London).Freud House at Maresfield Gardens (Photo: Burcu Dogramaci, 2018).
    London
    Gerty Simon
    Photographer

    The Berlin photographer Gerty Simon established a studio in Chelsea, London. Her solo exhibition Camera Portraits from 1935 featured a distinctive portrait of the émigré art dealer Alfred Flechtheim (shown above).

    Word Count: 30

    Gerty Simon, Portrait of Alfred Flechtheim, London, c. 1935 (The Bernard Simon Estate, Wiener Holocaust Library Collections).
    Gerty Simon, Portrait of Lotte Lenya, London, c. 1935 (The Bernard Simon Estate, Wiener Holocaust Library Collections).Gerty Simon’s business card in London (The Bernard Simon Estate, Wiener Holocaust Library Collections).Invitation to the private view of Gerty Simon’s London Personalities exhibition, London 1934 (The Bernard Simon Estate, Wiener Holocaust Library Collections).
    London
    Aid to Russia
    Exhibition

    The Aid to Russia exhibition was organised in 1942 by the emigré architect Ernö Goldfinger and his wife, the painter Ursula Goldfinger, at their house in Hampstead.

    Word Count: 26

    Aid to Russia exhibition at 2 Willow Road, 1942, with Pablo Picasso’s La Niçoise, 1937 – today known as the portrait of Nusch Eluard. On the right: Nancy Cunard (Archive 2 Willow Road, National Trust Collections. With kind permission of the Goldfinger Family. © Ernö Goldfinger).
    Goldfinger House, 2 Willow Road, London Hampstead, site of the Aid for Russia exhibition, 1942 (Photo: Mareike Hetschold/Sonja Hull, 2017).Ernö Goldfinger, 2 Willow Road, Hampstead, 1939, interior, dining room, photo: Dell & Wainwright (Architectural Press Archive / RIBA Collections, RIBA8557). The flexible floor plan by means of mobile walls allowed variable use of space for social occasions but also for exhibitions such as Aid to Russia in 1942.Catalogue of the Aid to Russia exhibition, 1942 (Archive 2 Willow Road, National Trust Collections. With kind permission of the Goldfinger Family. © Ernö Goldfinger).Aid to Russia exhibition in 2 Willow Road, 1942, Opening (Archive 2 Willow Road, National Trust Collections. With kind permission of the Goldfinger Family. © Ernö Goldfinger).
    London