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Dimitri Ismailovitch

  • Given name:
    Dimitri
  • Last name:
    Ismailovitch
  • Alternative names:

    Дмитрий Васильевич Измайлович, Дмитро Васильович Ізмайлович, Dmitriy Ismailovitch, Dimitri Ismaelovitch, Dimitri İzmailovitsch, Dimitri Izmaïlowitch, Dimitri İsmailoviç

  • Date of Birth:
    11-04-1890
  • Place of Birth:
    Sataniv (UA)
  • Date of Death:
    15-10-1976
  • Place of Death:
    Rio de Janeiro (BR)
  • Profession:
    Art HistorianPainter
  • Introduction:

    In Istanbul, Ismailovitch became one of the leaders of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, organised three solo exhibitions, and made contribution to the study of Byzantine art.

    Word Count: 29

  • Signature Image:
    Dimitri Ismailovitch with his bust created by Polish sculptor Roman Bilinski, Istanbul, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
  • Content:

    The son of a cavalry officer, Dimitri Ismailovitch was, from 1900 to 1907, a cadet in Ukraine, from 1907 to 1909 a cadet in St. Petersburg, and in 1911 participated in military maneuvers in France as a young lieutenant. It is interesting that a military career not only did not interfere with Ismailovitch’s passion for painting but rather encouraged it. As he himself recounted, it was in the cadet corps that he met such drawing masters as Lev Dmitriev-Kavkazski’s, whose classes he attended in St. Petersburg, and, while on maneuvers in France, he was able to visit the museums of Paris. All this knowledge and experience (along with his talent) allowed him to leave his military career at the end of the First World War and enter the Ukrainian Academy of Arts in Kiev (one of his teachers was Mykhailo Ivanovych Zhuk), where his first solo exhibition was held. Alas, the whirlwind of revolutionary events forced the artist to leave the Russian Empire. At the end of 1919, Ismailovitch was evacuated to Istanbul. At first things did not go well, and he even had to work at one of the local secondhands. As he himself wrote, he arrived in the city “with a box of paints as the only livelihood.” This box of paints undoubtedly served him well as the city inspired him to paint landscapes almost from the very first minute. Later, works on Byzantine themes (especially after the secretary of the American Embassy, Gardiner Howland Shaw, commissioned from him a copy of one of Kariye Mosque’s mosaics) and still life-paintings were added to the landscapes. It is worth noting that his friend Alexis Gritchenko greatly assisted him in his understanding of Byzantine art. At the same time, Ismailovitch was keen to continue the work of the Russian Archaeological Institute, which was forced first to suspend and then completely wind up its activities. The newspaper article recounting how the artist turned to Halil Ethem Bey with a request to take measures to preserve the Byzantine fresco in the Kemankeş Mosque, and the fact that he wrote a report on the state of the wall paintings in the Kariye Mosque at the request of the Byzantologist Viktor Lazarev, suggest that he did indeed prove himself to be a worthy successor of the Russian Archaeological Institute’s officials. As explained by Gerol’d Vzdornov: “Thanks to Ismailovitch, historians of Byzantine painting have the opportunity to imagine what Kariye’s mosaics and frescoes were like in the interval between their publication in 1906 by Fyodor Schmidt and the beginning of the restoration work of the American Byzantine Institute after the Second World War.” Nadia Podzemskaia examines this matter in detail in one of her articles.
    In addition, Dimitri Ismailovitch was one of the leaders of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople. He was mainly involved in organising exhibitions and so was in regular communication with local representatives of the art world. He not only took an active part in the Union's collective exhibitions (including First Russian émigré artists in Istanbul exhibition and Exhibition of Russian émigré artists at Taksim Military Barracks where his bust by Roman Bilinski was presented), but also organised at least three solo exhibitions in Istanbul (the first was held at Mayak, Bursa Street 40 – now Sadri Alışık 40, on 20 November 1921; the second on 2 April 1924 in the premises of R.O.S., a Russian club on 15 Telgraf Street, now presumably Tel Sokak 19; the third at the end of October 1924 at Robert College). Here is what the newspapers wrote about his work in the 1920s: “The artist worked a lot and thoughtfully on the views of Constantinople, focusing on the reproduction of the immortal images of Byzantine church architecture with great love. There is a lot of taste in the choice of subjects and in the selection of colours. The old walls and porticoes of the temples on some of the canvases are just excellent, and they deserve more than just a one-day ‘refugee’ exhibition” (Anonymous, “Vystavka Kartin Ismailovitcha”, 1921). His other works, such as still-life paintings with Turkish bath attributes, Turkish crockery and clothing materials speak of a keen interest in local culture and good observation skills. Subsequently, recalling his Istanbul years, he wrote in one of his letters: “It was a very difficult time but an empty stomach never diminished my enthusiasm for painting.”

    Approximately seven years in Istanbul turned out to be incredibly fruitful for Dimitri Ismailovitch, but nevertheless in March 1927 he left Turkey and moved to Rio de Janeiro. However, interest in his Istanbul works was so strong that he held an exhibition in Athens at the invitation of the Greek government before moving, and later held exhibitions in Washington and New York (at the request of a local museum). In 1928, after moving to Brazil, another solo exhibition of the artist was held at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. In subsequent years, while living in Brazil, whose “charm of tropical nature” won him over, he continued to work tirelessly and every year saw the opening of a new exhibition of his works. In Brazil, he mainly improved himself in the portrait genre. According to Rafael Cardoso, "press coverage in Brazil often associated his work with Russian and Byzantine icons, as well as with religious mysticism" (Cardoso 2021, 237). Although it is known that "in the later period he also created non-figurative paintings, which he called 'exercises' and did not show at exhibitions" (Leykind 2019). In 1948, his solo exhibition took place in Bordeaux, France (at that time he was already a citizen of Brazil) where among other works his watercolors of ethnographic nature, depicting Turks, Greeks, Armenians and Arabs of Istanbul were presented. It is also known that he gave painting lessons: from among his students he especially singled out Maria Margarida de Lima Soutello (she worked under the name Maria Margarida), with whom he held several exhibitions. In 1954 he painted icons for the Russian Greek Catholic Church in Sao Paulo. It is also worth noting that he received a huge number and variety of awards and medals for participating in the Brazilian Salon of Fine Arts, and two of his works are permanent exhibits at the National Museum of Fine Arts of Rio de Janeiro (Museu Nacional de Belas Artes).

    Word Count: 1038

  • Media:
    Dimitri Ismailovitch, 1907, Sumy Cadet Corps (with permission from https://www.ria1914.info/).
    Dimitri Ismailovitch with his bust created by Polish sculptor Roman Bilinski, Istanbul, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Reproduction of the Kariye Mosque’s mosaic. In the foreground is its author, Dimitri Ismailovitch (Russkiye na Bosfore. Les Russes sur le Bosphore Almanac, 1928, n.p.).
    Photographs of the artworks by Dimitri Ismailovitch, 1923. Source: Album “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from D. Ismailovitch”, XII–XI, p. 11 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Photographs of the artworks by Dimitri Ismailovitch, 1924. Source: Album “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from D. Ismailovitch”, 9–10, p. 24 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Photographs of the artworks by Dimitri Ismailovitch. Source: Album “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from D. Ismailovitch”, p. 36 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Front cover of the 1948 Dimitri İsmailovitch exhibition catalogue (© Musée des Beaux-Arts, Bordeaux).
    Ekaterina Aygün chanced upon Dimitri Ismailovitch's visiting card at the Avni Lifij exhibition in Istanbul. This is further evidence of contact between Ismailovitch and Turkish painters (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2019).
    The Piyale Pasha Mosque (was designed by Mimar Sinan and rebuilt in the mid. of the 19th century) was depicted by Dimitri İsmailovitch and Alexis Gritchenko in 1920 (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2021).
  • Bibliography (selected):

    Anonymous. “Hudojestvennaya Vystavka.” Presse du Soir, 19 November 1921, p. 4.

    Anonymous. “Vystavka Kartin Ismailovitcha.” Presse du Soir, 21 November 1921, p. 4.

    Anonymous. “Vystavka Soyuza Russkih Hudojnikov.” Presse du Soir, 19 June 1922, n.p.

    Anonymous. “Otkrytiye Vizantiyskoy Freski.” Presse du Soir, 2 November 1922, p. 3.

    Bournakine, Anatoliy, editor. Russkiye na Bosfore. Les Russes sur le Bosphore. Imp. L. Babok & fils, 1928.

    Cardoso, Rafael. Modernity in black and white: art and image, race and identity in Brazil, 1890-1945. Cambridge University Press, 2021.

    Gritchenko, Alexis. İstanbul’da İki Yıl 1919–1921 – Bir Ressamın Günlüğü. Translated by Ali Berktay, Yapı Kredi Yayınları, 2020.

    Hisamutdinov, A. “Russkiye v Brazilii.” Latinskaya America, no. 9, 2005, n.p., http://www.ilaran.ru/?n=122. Accessed 12 August 2020.

    Leykind, Oleg, et al. Hudojniki Russkogo Zarubej’ya (1). Izd.dom “Mir”, 2019, p. 576.

    Pereleshin, V. “Zamechatel’niy Russkiy Hudojnik.” Russkaya Mysl' (Paris), 18 November 1976, n.p.

    Podzemskaia, N. “À propos des copies de la peinture byzantine à Istanbul: les artistes émigrés et l’Institut byzantin d’Amérique.” Histoire de l’art, no. 44, 1999, pp. 123–140.

    Vzdornov, Gerol’d. “Russkiye hudojniki i vizantiyskaya starina v Konstantinopole.” Tvorchestvo, no. 2, 1992, pp. 30–32.

    Word Count: 173

  • Archives and Sources:

    Private Archive of Dimitri Ismailovitch that belongs to Eduardo Mendes Cavalcanti (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil).

    Archives & Special Collections, The College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, Massachusetts).

    Istanbul Çelik Gülersoy Library.

    Slavonic Library (Slovanská knihovna) in Prague.

    Word Count: 38

  • Acknowledgements:

    I wish to express my most sincere gratitude to Eduardo Mendes Cavalcanti for his valuable assistance. I am also very grateful to the representatives of the Archives & Special Collections at the College of the Holy Cross (Worcester, Massachusetts) for their enormous help. Finally I would like to thank Rafael Cardoso without whose support this entry would not have been the way it is now.

    Word Count: 65

  • Author:
    Ekaterina Aygün
  • Exile:

    Istanbul, Ottoman Empire/Turkey (1919–1927); Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (1927–1976).

  • Known addresses in Metromod cities:

    Bursa Street 40 (now Sadri Alışık 40), Beyoğlu, Istanbul (studio); Küçük Yazıcı 4 (now presumably Tarlabaşı Blv. 79), Hüseyinağa, Beyoğlu, Istanbul (studio); Bekiar sokak 32 (now presumably Bekar sokak 32a), Beyoğlu, İstanbul (residence); R.O.S., Telgraf Street 15 (now presumably Tel Sokak 19), Beyoğlu (solo exhibition); Robert College (now Boğaziçi University), Bebek, Istanbul (solo exhibition).

  • Metropolis:
    Istanbul
  • Ekaterina Aygün. "Dimitri Ismailovitch." METROMOD Archive, 2021, https://archive.metromod.net/viewer.p/69/2949/object/5138-10436644, last modified: 22-09-2021.
  • Alexis Gritchenko
    PainterArt Historian

    During the two years of his life that he spent in Istanbul, Alexis Gritchenko produced more paintings dedicated to the city than many artists produce in an entire lifetime.

    Word Count: 29

    Portrait of Alexis Gritchenko by Turkish painter Namık İsmail, 1920. Private collection. Istanbul, Meşher Art Gallery, “Alexis Gritchenko – İstanbul Yılları” Exhibition (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2020).
    Portrait of Alexis Gritchenko by Turkish painter Namık İsmail, 1920. Private collection. Istanbul, Meşher Art Gallery, “Alexis Gritchenko – İstanbul Yılları” Exhibition (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2020).Istanbul, Meşher Art Gallery, “Alexis Gritchenko – İstanbul Yılları” Exhibition (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2020).Byzantine Church Converted Into a Mosque, March 1920. Collection of the National Art Museum of Ukraine. Istanbul, Meşher Art Gallery, “Alexis Gritchenko – İstanbul Yılları” Exhibition (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2020).Landscape with Domes, October 1920. Collection of the National Art Museum of Ukraine. Istanbul, Meşher Art Gallery, “Alexis Gritchenko – İstanbul Yılları” Exhibition (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2020).Street in Eyüp, November 1920. Ömer Koç Koleksiyonu. Istanbul, Meşher Art Gallery, “Alexis Gritchenko – İstanbul Yılları” Exhibition (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2020).Three Turks in a Coffeehouse, February 1921. Ömer Koç Koleksiyonu. Istanbul, Meşher Art Gallery, “Alexis Gritchenko – İstanbul Yılları” Exhibition (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2020).
    Istanbul
    Iraida Barry
    Sculptor

    After the Russian Revolution of 1917, Barry settled in Istanbul, where she lived until her death. She is remembered as one of the first female sculptors of the Turkish Republic.

    Word Count: 29

    Iraida Barry, photography, detail (© Cengiz Kahraman Koleksiyonu, Istanbul).
    Iraida Barry (© Cengiz Kahraman Koleksiyonu, Istanbul).Iraida Barry’s studio at the Mısır Apartments (© Cengiz Kahraman Koleksiyonu, Istanbul).Iraida Barry’s studio at the Mısır Apartments (© Cengiz Kahraman Koleksiyonu, Istanbul).
    Istanbul
    Nikolai Saretzki
    PainterGraphic ArtistIllustratorArt CriticCollectorScene Designer

    Saretzki took a rather long exile route: from the Russian Empire he fled to Istanbul, from Istanbul to Berlin, from Berlin to Prague, and from Prague to Cormeilles-en-Parisis near Paris.

    Word Count: 30

    Nikolai Saretzki, 1927 (Gebrauchsgraphik, October 1928).
    Self-portrait by Nikolai Saretzki/Saretzky, 1921, Constantinople (Gebrauchsgraphik, 1926).Nikolai Saretzki, 1927 (Gebrauchsgraphik, October 1928).Fish trade, by Nikolai Saretzki, 1922 (© Russian State Archive of Literature and Art, Moscow. All Rights Reserved).
    Istanbul
    Traugott Fuchs
    PhilologistRomanistPoetPainter

    Traugott Fuchs was a multi-talented philologist, painter and poet who lived in Istanbul from 1934 until the end of his life in 1997.

    Word Count: 21

    Traugott Fuchs with his cat Traugotta at Robert College, photographer unknown, December 1960 (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul).
    Traugott Fuchs, Self-portrait, c. 1940 (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul).Traugott Fuchs, Hekimbaşı Salih Efendi Yalısı, Anadolu Hisarı, c. 1984 (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul). Fuchs draw the villa on the shores of the Bosporus many years after he lived there in 1938.Traugott Fuchs, Harvest I, Çorum, 1945 (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul). This rural scene was drawn during internment.Traugott Fuchs, Lonely tomb at naked mountain, Çorum, 1945 (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul). The artist painted this picture during internment.Traugott Fuchs, Sailing ship close to Istanbul, c. 1950s (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul).Traugott Fuchs, City silhouette with load carrier, n.d. (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul).Sébah & Joaillier, Robert Collège, Rumeli Hissar, 1904, photograph, postcard (https://www.flickr.com/photos/saltonline/14243596745/, SALT Araştırma, Fotoğraf Arşivi). Main building and campus of Robert College on the European side of Istanbul, where Traugott Fuchs taught and lived from 1952.Traugott Fuchs, Young man bathing in blue water, n.d., coloured pencil on paper (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul). This drawing refers to a poem by the Orientalist Hellmut Ritter, with whom Traugott Fuchs had a close friendship. Ritter gave Fuchs refuge in his house in Bebek when he returned from internment in Çorum.Hellmut Ritter. “Das Bad im Mittelmeer.” Castrum Peregrini, vol. LXXXIX, Amsterdam, 1969, 94f. (Photo: Gregor Langfeld). Ritter’s poem can be read as a dialogue with the Young man bathing in blue water by Traugott Fuchs.Traugott Fuchs, Kleine Käsflattermalve, n.d. (Traugott-Fuchs-Archiv Istanbul).Traugott Fuchs’s headstone, Feriköy cemetery, Istanbul (Photo: Richard Wittmann, 2019).
    Istanbul
    Foster Waterman Stearns
    LibrarianDiplomatCollectorPolitician

    Foster W. Stearns not only actively supported Russian-speaking émigré artists in Istanbul but also assembled a collection of their works which has survived to this day.

    Word Count: 26

    Foster Waterman Stearns, by Nikolai Becker, 1923. Foster Waterman Stearns was the third secretary of the American Embassy in Istanbul from 1921 to 1923 (© Courtesy of the Holy Cross Archives, Worcester, MA. All Rights Reserved).
    Foster Waterman Stearns, by Nikolai Becker, 1923. Foster Waterman Stearns was the third secretary of the American Embassy in Istanbul from 1921 to 1923 (© Courtesy of the Holy Cross Archives, Worcester, MA. All Rights Reserved).Formal letter of thanks to Foster Waterman Stearns from the members of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 2 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Formal letter of thanks to Martha Stearns from the members of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 9 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Portrait by Mikhail Starikoff, Istanbul, most likely 1921/1922. Mikhail Starikoff was a Russian émigré artist who first settled in Istanbul where he was a member of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople and later moved to France (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Work by Alexandre Pankoff, Istanbul, 1922. Alexandre Pankoff was an émigré artist from the Russian Empire and a member of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople who is famous for his colour frontispiece for Memoirs of Halide Edib (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Landscape by Pavel Kravchenko, Istanbul, 1922. The writing on the back is indecipherable, but most likely says: “The Asian Shore of the Bosphorus”. Pavel Kravchenko was an émigré artist from the Russian Empire and a secretary of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople. His fate is unknown (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Christos Pancratos (Zeyrek Mosque / Monastery of the Pantocrator) by P. Fedoroff, Istanbul, 1922. P. Fedoroff was an émigré artist from the Russian Empire and a member of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople. Presumably he was Pyotr Fedoroff, who settled in Paris in 1924 and mainly worked as a painter of icons (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Caricature by Mitritch Karelin, Istanbul, 1922. Mitritch Karelin was an émigré artist from the Russian Empire and a member of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople. Presumably, Mitritch is a pseudonym, and this caricature (as well as others from this series on Istanbul) was created by Vladimir Kadulin, who liked to use different brush names (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Letter from Pyotr Wrangel to Foster Waterman Stearns, Box 2, Folder 2 of Stearns Family Papers (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Istanbul
    Nikolai Saraphanoff
    PainterIllustrator

    The artist is known for his numerous works with views of Istanbul, the design of the famous almanac’s cover, and the creation of decorative panels. Alas, his artistic activities were interrupted by his imprisonment.

    Word Count: 35

    Self-portrait by Nikolai Saraphanoff who created an elegant cover for the almanac Les Russes sur le Bosphore, 1927 (Russkiye na Bosfore. Les Russes sur le Bosphore Almanac, 1928, n.p.).
    Cover of Les Russes sur le Bosphore Almanac by Nikolai Saraphanoff, 1927.
    Istanbul
    Roman Bilinski
    PainterSculptorCollectorArt restorer

    At the beginning of the 1920s, a member of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, Roman Bilinski was known as a sculptor. At the end of the 1920s–beginning of the 1930s – as a sculptor, painter and connoisseur of local antiques.

    Word Count: 42

    Self-portrait by Roman Bilinski. Turkey, 1936 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).
    Painter Dimitri Ismailovitch with his bust created by Polish sculptor Roman Bilinski, Istanbul, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Formal letter of thanks to Martha Stearns from the members of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, 1922. One of the signatures is Roman Bilinski’s. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 9 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Bilinski's monument to the Polish poet Adam Mickiewicz in Polonezköy was demolished but its plaque has been preserved (Postcard from Polonezköy, 2021).Adampol (Polonezköy) by Roman Bilinski (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).Adampol (Polonezköy) by Roman Bilinski. Turkey, 1935 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).Adampol (Polonezköy) by Roman Bilinski. Turkey, 1936 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).Adampol (Polonezköy) by Roman Bilinski. Turkey, 1936 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).Adampol (Polonezköy) by Roman Bilinski. Turkey, 1936 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).Adampol (Polonezköy) by Roman Bilinski. Turkey, 1936 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).Work by Roman Bilinski. Turkey, 1936 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).Work by Roman Bilinski. Yugoslavia, 1936 (Private Archive of Diana Bilinski).The cover of the book by Marco Farotto, Roman Bilinski - Un artista cosmopolita nel Ponente ligure. According to the author, Bilinski used to walk around dressed in this way.
    Istanbul
    Les Russes sur le Bosphore
    Almanac

    The almanac Les Russes sur le Bosphore is a joint work of Russian-speaking émigrés in Istanbul who were faced with the challenge of leaving the country or becoming naturalised.

    Word Count: 30

    Cover of Les Russes sur le Bosphore Almanac, 1927.
    Cover of Russians on the Bosphorus (Les Russes sur le Bosphore Almanac, 1927).Newspaper announcement concerning the publication of the almanac (Radio Newspaper, 1927, n.p.).Newspaper announcement concerning the almanac’s publication and its points of sale (Radio Newspaper, 1927, p. 3).Self-portrait by Nikolai Saraphanof who created an elegant cover for the almanac, 1927 (Russkiye na Bosfore. Les Russes sur le Bosphore Almanac, 1928, n.p.).
    Istanbul
    Russkiy v Konstantinopole/Le Russe à Constantinople
    Guide-book

    The guide-book was created for Russian-speaking refugees who had to leave their country and settle in Constantinople.

    Word Count: 17

    Russkiy v Konstantinopole / Le Russe à Constantinople, 1921, cover (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).
    Announcement concerning the publication of the guide-book in the Russian newspaper Presse du Soir, 1921, n.p. (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Russkiy v Konstantinopole / Le Russe à Constantinople, 1921, cover (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Layout of the Grand Rue de Péra (Istiklal Street) from the guide-book, 1921 (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Schematic plan of Constantinople for ‘Russian’ refugees in the guide-book Russkiy v Konstantinopole/Le Russe à Constantinople, 1921 (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Most common words in Turkish for ‘Russian’ refugees from the guide-book, 1921 (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).
    Istanbul
    First Russian émigré artists in Istanbul exhibition
    Exhibition

    The first Russian-speaking émigré artists in Istanbul exhibition was a one-day event but its success led to the formation of the Union and paved the way for other exhibitions.

    Word Count: 29

    Portrait of the poet Maximilian Voloshin (one of the representatives of the Symbolist movement in Russian culture and literature) by Boleslav Cybis that was presented at the exhibition. Boleslav Cybis was an émigré artist from the Russian Empire and a member of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople who was fond of representing truths symbolically, combining figurative thinking with ideas of the avant-garde (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Members of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Portrait of the poet Maximilian Voloshin (one of the representatives of the Symbolist movement in Russian culture and literature) by Boleslav Cybis that was presented at the exhibition. Boleslav Cybis was an émigré artist from the Russian Empire and a member of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople who was fond of representing truths symbolically, combining figurative thinking with ideas of the avant-garde (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Istanbul
    Exhibition of Russian émigré artists at Taksim Military Barracks
    Exhibition

    The exhibition of Russian-speaking émigré artists at Taksim Military Barracks was the first major exhibition organised by the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople.

    Word Count: 24

    Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople exhibition foyer, Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 11 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople exhibition foyer, Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 11 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Members of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople exhibition at Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 10 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Sculptures at the Union of Russian Painters exhibition in Constantinople, Taksim military barracks, summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 5 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Works of the Artel of Russian Craftsmen in Constantinople, Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 6 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople exhibition at Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 7 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople exhibition at Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Istanbul
    Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople
    Association

    The Union existed for less than two years but in that short space of time a tremendous amount of work was done by its members, refugees from the Russian Empire.

    Word Count: 30

    Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople logo from 1922 membership card of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople (Private Archive of Dimitri Ismailovitch that belongs to Eduardo Mendes Cavalcanti).
    Members of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).1922 membership card of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople (Private Archive of Dimitri Ismailovitch that belongs to Eduardo Mendes Cavalcanti).Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople logo painted by T. Sabaneeff, 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 1 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).One of the exhibitions of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 10 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Exhibition of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople at Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 6 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Istanbul
    Konstantinopol’skiy Kommercheskiy Klub
    Club

    KKK was probably the most popular Russian club in Beyoğlu district between 1924 and 1926. Not only Russian émigrés but also local residents could enjoy its constantly updated entertainment programme.

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    Some of the Russian artists who took an active part in the club’s events, clockwise from top left: violinist Pavel Alekseevich Zamoulenko, singer Maria de Monighetti, ballerina Yevgeniya Vorobyova, poet and musician Ivan Andreevich Korvatsky (Zarubezhnyi Klich almanacs of 1925).
    The name of the club as listed in the Zarubezhnyi Klich almanac, April 1925.The first chairman of the club, Nikolai Alekseevich Ilyin-Chesmensky (Zarubezhnyi Klich almanac, April 1925, n.p.).Some of the Russian artists who took an active part in the club’s events, clockwise from top left: violinist Pavel Alekseevich Zamoulenko, singer Maria de Monighetti, ballerina Yevgeniya Vorobyova, poet and musician Ivan Andreevich Korvatsky (Zarubezhnyi Klich almanacs of 1925).Istiklal Caddesi 130 (Elhamra Han), Beyoğlu, Istanbul (Photo: Ekaterina Aygün, 2019).
    Istanbul