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Vladimir Kadulin

  • Given name:
    Vladimir
  • Last name:
    Kadulin
  • Alternative names:

    Владимир Федорович Кадулин, Наядин, Nayadin, Dulin, Val’demar, Mitritch, Mitritch Karelin

  • Date of Birth:
    15-12-1884
  • Place of Birth:
    Kamieniec Podolski (UA)
  • Date of Death:
    20-11-1957
  • Place of Death:
    Manhattan (US)
  • Profession:
    CaricaturistPainter
  • Introduction:

    When it comes to Russian émigré caricaturists in Istanbul, Vladimir Kadulin who worked under the pseudonym Nayadin for the almanac Zarnitsy is the first to come to mind.

    Word Count: 28

  • Signature Image:
    The group of initiators of the convocation of the All-Russian Congress of Artists, Kiev, 1910. Vladimir Kadulin is on the far right (Kievskaya Mysl’, no.16, 18 April 1910).
  • Content:

    When it comes to Russian émigré caricaturists in Istanbul, Vladimir Kadulin is the first to come to mind. The artist, who achieved considerable success in the Russian Empire, worked under the pseudonym Nayadin for the almanac Zarnitsy, published in Istanbul in the Russian language.
    Before arriving in Istanbul, Vladimir first studied at the Moscow School of Painting, Sculpture and Architecture and then at the Kiev Art School, but due to financial problems he could not complete his studies. However, this did not prevent him from becoming a well-known artist, since at that time he had already collaborated with many Kiev periodicals, that printed satirical drawings. In addition, one of the local publishers asked him to work on a series of humorous postcards. Kadulin agreed and apparently made the right decision because the series was a huge success. It was followed by the series Types of Students, Types of Schoolgirls, Drunken Series, as well as numerous Easter and Christmas cards.

    His career prospered, but the Revolution of 1917 had a major impact on people’s lives. The first city on Kadulin’s route of emigration was Istanbul. Judging by a magazine article, he was in a very difficult situation at first and earned money with small drawings that he or his wife sold directly on the street. Thus, we learn from the Zarnitsy almanac that he had to make a living by selling portraits of famous Greek leaders such as Eleftherios Venizelos and Constantine I. On the one hand, since both were incredibly popular among the local Greeks, this “business” was quite profitable (in exchange for these small portraits, he and his wife could buy sugar, tea, and coffee and pay for a cheap hotel in Galata), but on the other hand, it was very risky because of serious disagreements between these two figures and opposing views of their supporters. Fortunately, Kadulin was lucky in Istanbul too. He was invited to work for the almanac Zarnitsy, the editorial office of which was located at the beginning (if you come from the Karaköy or Galata quarters) of the famous, long and busy street Grand rue de Péra (now İstiklal Avenue). During his work at Zarnitsy, he drew many caricatures and designed almost all the covers of the almanac. Most of his works were devoted to the difficult life of Russian émigrés abroad and the mockery of the Bolsheviks; Sevinç Üçgül analyses them in detail in one of her articles. He also took part in the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople's exhibitions under the pseudonym Mitritch.
    The source of income disappeared with the ending of the almanac, and some serious changes were underway in the Ottoman Empire at that time, which made it necessary to move somewhere else. Kadulin decided that this place should be New York. There he worked as a caricaturist and often addressed Russian issues. Everyone who knew him at the time recognised his great observation skills, sharp humour and professionalism.

    Word Count: 495

  • Media:
    The group of initiators of the convocation of the All-Russian Congress of Artists, Kiev, 1910. Vladimir Kadulin is on the far right (Kievskaya Mysl’, no.16, 18 April 1910).
    One of the caricatures by Nayadin (Vladimir Kadulin), Before The Storm: “The newspapers: ‘Many millions of peasants, sweeping away everything in their path, go to Moscow.’ Lenin: Oh! It seems to me that this time even foreign umbrellas won't help us…” (Zarnitsy, no. 21, 4 September 1921).
    One of the wall paintings by Vladimir Kadulin in Katinka Restaurant in Tampa, Florida (Tampa Bay Times, 8 November 1926, p. 18).
    Teaching The Doctrines of Marx by Vladimir Kadulin (Sioux City Journal (Sioux City, Iowa), 20 September 1931, p. 27).
  • Bibliography (selected):

    Chebyshev, Nikolay. Blizkaya Dal’: Vospominaniya. Imp. de Navarre, 1933.

    Miller, Vera. “Vladimir Fedorovich Kadulin.” findagrave.com, https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/184348086/_. Accessed 3 June 2020.

    Nayadin. “Konstantinopol’skiye Dni. Venizelos.” Zarnitsy, 28 August 1921, pp. 6–8.

    Üçgül, Sevinç. “Izdatel’skaya deyatel’nost’ Russkoy emigratsii v Stambule: po materialam al’manaha Zarnitsy.” Russkaya belaya emigratsiya v Turtsii vek spustya 1919–2019, edited by Türkan Olcay, DRZ, 2019, pp. 194–221.

    Zhukov, V. “Student İGİ sto let nazad glazami hudojnika-karikaturista V.F. Kadulina.” Za Stroitel’niye Kadry, April 2017, p. 1.

    Word Count: 78

  • Acknowledgements:

    My deepest thanks go to Slavonic Library (Slovanská knihovna) in Prague.

    Word Count: 11

  • Author:
    Ekaterina Aygün
  • Exile:

    Istanbul, Ottoman Empire/Turkey (?–1923); New York, United States (1923–1957).

  • Known addresses in Metromod cities:

    Appartements du Tunnel (now Tünel Meydanı Sk. 2/B), Beyoğlu, Istanbul (studio).

  • Metropolis:
    Istanbul
  • Ekaterina Aygün. "Vladimir Kadulin." METROMOD Archive, 2021, https://archive.metromod.net/viewer.p/69/2949/object/5138-10440402, last modified: 20-10-2022.
  • Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze kadar
    Book

    The Viennese Ernst Diez lived in Turkey from 1943 to 1950. His textbook Türk Sanatı (1946) stirred a debate on Turkish art and its relations to Byzantine and Armenian art.

    Word Count: 28

    Ernst Diez. Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze Kadar. Univ. Matbaası, 1946, p. 49.
    Ernst Diez. Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze Kadar. Univ. Matbaası, 1946 (University of Hamburg, Library of the Asien-Afrika-Institut).Ernst Diez. Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze Kadar. Univ. Matbaası, 1946, pp. 42–43. Diez illustrated his book with photographs from his internment in Kırşehir (University of Hamburg, Library of the Asien-Afrika-Institut).Ernst Diez. Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze Kadar. Univ. Matbaası, 1946, pp. 48–49. Diez mentions Yeşil Cami (Green mosque) in Bursa and emphasises the impact of Armenian architecture (University of Hamburg, Library of the Asien-Afrika-Institut).Ernst Diez. Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze Kadar. Univ. Matbaası, 1946, pp. 84–85. Double page with Diez’s photograph of Melik Gazi Türbe in Kırşehir (University of Hamburg, Library of the Asien-Afrika-Institut).Ernst Diez. Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze Kadar, Istanbul: Univ. Matbaası, 1946, pp. 172–173. Double page with photographs of Şehzade and Yeni Valide mosques in Istanbul. (University of Hamburg, Library of the Asien-Afrika-Institut).Ernst Diez. Türk Sanatı. Başlangıcından Günümüze Kadar. Univ. Matbaası, 1946, pp. 176–177. Comparison between Ayasofya (Hagia Sophia) and Süleymaniye mosque. (University of Hamburg, Library of the Asien-Afrika-Institut).Ernst Diez, Turkey, around 1946 (Aslanapa 1993).Ernst Diez and Oktay Aslanapa (right beside him) on a student excursion to the Prince's Islands in Istanbul, 23 April 1950 (Estate of Oktay Aslanapa, Istanbul).
    Istanbul
    Russkiy v Konstantinopole/Le Russe à Constantinople
    Guide-book

    The guide-book was created for Russian-speaking refugees who had to leave their country and settle in Constantinople.

    Word Count: 17

    Russkiy v Konstantinopole / Le Russe à Constantinople, 1921, cover (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).
    Announcement concerning the publication of the guide-book in the Russian newspaper Presse du Soir, 1921, n.p. (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Russkiy v Konstantinopole / Le Russe à Constantinople, 1921, cover (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Layout of the Grand Rue de Péra (Istiklal Street) from the guide-book, 1921 (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Schematic plan of Constantinople for ‘Russian’ refugees in the guide-book Russkiy v Konstantinopole/Le Russe à Constantinople, 1921 (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).Most common words in Turkish for ‘Russian’ refugees from the guide-book, 1921 (Slavonic Library/Slovanská knihovna, Prague).
    Istanbul
    Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople
    Association

    The Union existed for less than two years but in that short space of time a tremendous amount of work was done by its members, refugees from the Russian Empire.

    Word Count: 30

    Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople logo from 1922 membership card of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople (Private Archive of Dimitri Ismailovitch that belongs to Eduardo Mendes Cavalcanti).
    Members of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 8 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).1922 membership card of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople (Private Archive of Dimitri Ismailovitch that belongs to Eduardo Mendes Cavalcanti).Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople logo painted by T. Sabaneeff, 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 1 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).One of the exhibitions of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 10 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).Exhibition of the Union of Russian Painters in Constantinople at Taksim military barracks, Summer 1922. Source: Scrapbook “To Mr. and Mrs. Stearns from Russian Painters”, p. 6 (Stearns Family Papers. Archives & Special Collections. The College of the Holy Cross).
    Istanbul